Learn on Demand
TRIUMPH: Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury
Presenter: Thomas Kiser, MD
View Activity Information

Knowledge Gap: 
The purpose of this activity is to educate healthcare providers with the most up-to-date information on Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury.

Target Audience
The target audience includes all healthcare professionals such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists and allied health professionals who would like to learn about Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury and how it pertains to their respective profession.

 
Release and Expiration Dates
3/9/2017 - 3/9/2020

Objectives

  1. Learn why upper limb function is critical to the health and quality of life in spinal cord injury.
  2. Discuss the appropriate methods for bed positioning, transfers, and wheelchair prescription to protect the upper limbs.
  3. Understand treatment methods to manage upper limb injury in SCI.

Biographical Info

Thomas Kiser, MD, is Professor of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and is Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission Medical Director. Kiser's professional certifications are the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Spinal Cord Medicine.

He has worked actively in various aspects of rehab for more than 20 years.

 Currently Kiser practices at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Physical medicine and rehabilitation department in the Jackson T. Stephens Spine and Neurosciences Institute and Baptist Health Rehabilitation Institute. 





 


 

References




  1.  [1] Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine. (2005). Preservation of upper limb function following spinal cord injury: A clinical practice guideline for health-care professionals. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine.

    [1] Sie IH, Waters RL, Adkins RH, Gellman H. Upper extremity pain in the postrehabilitation spinal cord injured patient. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 73 (1992):44-8.

    [1] Aljure J, Eltori I, Bradley WE, Lin JE, Johnson B. Carpal tunnel syndrome in paraplegic patients. Paraplegia 23 (1985): 182-6.

    [1] Gellman H, Chandler DR, Petrasek J, Sie I, Adkins R, Waters RL. Carpal tunnel syndrome in paraplegic patients. Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (American Volume) 70 (1988): 517-9.

    [1] Boninger ML, Impink BG, Cooper RA, Koontz A. Relationship between median and ulnar nerve function and wrist kinematics during wheelchair propulsion. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 85 (7) (2004):1141-5.

    [1] Beckman CE, Miller-Porter L, Schoneberger M. Energy cost of propulsion in standard and ultralight wheelchairs in people with spinal cord injuries. Phys Ther 79 (1999): 146-58.

    [1] Fitzgerald SG, Cooper RA Boninger ML, Rentschler AJ. Comparison of fatigue life for 3 types of manual wheelchairs. Arcives of Physical Medicine &Rehabilitation 82 (10) (2001): 1484-8.

    [1] Curtis KA, Kindlin CM, Riech KM, White DE. Functional reach in wheelchair users: the effects of trunk and lower extremity stabilization. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 76(1995): 360-7.

    [1] Klefbeck G, Mattsson E, WinberJ. The effect of trunk support on performance during arm ergometry in patients with cervical cord injuries. Paraplegia 34 (1996): 167-72.

    [1] Lynch SM, Leahy P, Barker SP. Reliability of measurements obtained with a modified functional reach test in subjects with spinal cord injury. Physical Therapy 78 (1998): 128-33.

    [1] Herberts P, Kadefors R, Hogfors C, Sigholm G. Shoulder pain and heavy manual labor. Clinical Orthopaedics & related research (1984): 166-78.

    [1] Wang YT, Kim CK, Fod III HT, Ford Jr HT. Reaction force and EMG analysis of wheelchair transfers. Perceptual & motor Skills 79 (1994): 763-6.

    [1] Dunn JA, Sinnott KA, Rothwell AG, Mohammed KD, Simcock JW. Tendon Transfer Surgery for People with Tetraplegia: An Overview. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 97 (2016) (6 Suppl 2):S75-80.

    [1] Fox IK, Davidge KM, Novak CB, Hoben G, Kahn LC, Juknis N, Ruvinskaya K, Mackinnon SE. Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Update and Preliminary Outcomes. Plast Reconstr Surg 136 (2015): 780-92.

    [1] Senjaya R, Midha R. Nerve Transfer Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury. World Neurosurg. (2013) 80, 6:e319-e326.

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2012.10.001

    [1] Lee D, Kwack K, Rah UW, Yoon S. Prolotherapy for Refractory Rotator Cuff Disease: Retrospective Case-Control Study of 1-Year Follow-Up. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 96 (2015): 2027-32.

    [1] Ibrahim VM, Groah SL, Libin A, Ljungberg IH. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma for the Treatment of Bicipital Tendinopathy in Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation 18(1) (2012):77–78.

    [1] Boninger ML, Cooper RA, Baldwin MA, Shimada SD, Koontz A. Wheelchair pushrim kinetics: body weight and median nerve function. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 80 (1999): 910-5.

    [1] Fronczak KJ, Boninger ML, Souza AL, Cooper RA. Wheelchair propulsion biomechanics, weight, and median nerve damage: a longitudinal study. In Proceedings of the 26rh annual RESNA conference, Atlanta, GA (2003), CD-Rom.

    [1] Harvey LA, Crosbie J. Weight bearing through flexed upper limbs in quadriplegics with paralyzed triceps brachii muscles. Spinal Cord 37 (1999): 780-5.

    [1] Harvey LA, Crosbie J. Biomechanical analysis of a weight relief maneuvers in C5 and C6 quadriplegia. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 81 (2000): 500-5.

    [1] Gellman H, Sie I, Waters RL. Late complications of weight-bearing upper extremity in the paraplegic patient. Clinical Orthopaedics & related research 233 (1988): 132-5.

    [1] Perry J, Gonle JK, Newsam CJ, Reyes ML, Mulroy SJ. Electromyographic analysis of the shoulder muscles during depression transfers in subjects with low-level paraplegia. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 77 (1996): 350-5.

    [1] Papuga MO, Member WE, Crago PE. Biomedics of sliding transfer: feasibility of FES assistance. (2002): 2382-3.

    [1] Gagnon D, Nadeau S, Gravel D, Noreau L, Lariviere C , Gagnon D. Biomechanical analysis of a posterior transfer maneuver on a level surface in individuals with high- and low-level spinal cord injuries. Clinical Biomechanics 18 (2003): 319-31.

    [1] Grevaldign P, Bohannon RW. Reduced push forces accompany device use during sliding transfers of seated subjects. Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development 38 (2001): 135-9.

    [1] Butler EE, Sabelman EE, Kiratli BJ. Accelerometric analysis of wheelchair/car transfer strategies for individuals with spinal cord injuries. In Proceedings for the Second national Department of VA Rehabilitation R&D Conference (2000).

 

Speaker Disclosures:
The planners, speakers, moderators, peer reviewers and /or panelists of this CE activity have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Planners: 
Kim Miller
Sarah Rhoads 
Susan Smith Dodson
Mark Jansen

Speaker:
Thomas Kiser, MD

Peer Reviewers: 
Kim Miller, MCHES


Instructions to obtain credit:

1.       Launch the activity 
2.       Complete the pre-test 
3.       View the entire activity online 
4.       Complete the post-test 
           (must pass the post-test with a score of 80% to receive credit)
           You may retake the post-test if you do not receive a passing score.
5.       Complete Evaluation 
Print certificate or transcript (Available in the “My Profile” tab).

 

ANCC Accreditation Statement:
The Office of Continuing Education, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation

Learn OnDemand Contact Us:
For information regarding this educational activity or website, please contact

UAMS Office of Continuing Education
4301 W. Markham #525
Little Rock, AR 72205
Phone: 501-661-7962 Fax: 501-661-7968

 

ACCME Accreditation Statement: 
The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Office of Continuing Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

UAMS Office of Continuing Education 
4301 West Markham Street #525 
Little Rock, AR 72205 
Phone: 501-661-7962 Fax: 501-661-7968

Direct Provider Statement 
The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Office of Continuing Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

Designation Statement 
The University of Arkansas for Medical Science Office of Continuing Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Disclosure Policy statement
It is the policy of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Medicine to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all directly or jointly provided educational activities. All individuals who are in a position to control the content of the educational activity (course/activity directors, planning committee members, staff, teachers, or authors of CE) must disclose all relevant financial relationships they have with any commercial interest(s) as well as the nature of the relationship. Financial relationships of the individual’s spouse or partner must also be disclosed, if the nature of the relationship could influence the objectivity of the individual in a position to control the content of the CE. The ACCME describes relevant financial relationships as those in any amount occurring within the past 12 months that create a conflict of interest. Individuals who refuse to disclose will be disqualified from participation in the development, management, presentation, or evaluation of the CE activity.

 

 


Type:  Internet Activity (Enduring Material)
12 Registered Users
Credits
1 Hours> Non-Accredited

1 Credits> Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

1 Contact Hours> American Nurses Credentialing Center> ANCC

1 CECH, 1 CECH> University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences> National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.